PAWS Chicago in 'urgent need' of foster families for cats, dogs

Thursday, August 17, 2017 07:16PM
Benton, a 6-year-old Beagle mix recovering from a double ACL surgery (PAWS Chicago)
Jones, a senior 12-year-old heartworm positive Cocker Spaniel (PAWS Chicago)
Galaxy (left) is a 3-month-old kitten receiving treatment for ringworm (PAWS Chicago)
Benton, a 6-year-old Beagle mix recovering from a double ACL surgery (PAWS Chicago)
Drexel, a 2-year-old Shepherd mix waiting for a dental procedure (PAWS Chicago)
Drexel, a 2-year-old Shepherd mix waiting for a dental procedure (PAWS Chicago)
Galaxy, a 3-month-old kitten receiving treatment for ringworm (PAWS Chicago)
Benton, a 6-year-old Beagle mix recovering from a double ACL surgery (PAWS Chicago)
Jones, a senior 12-year-old heartworm positive Cocker Spaniel (PAWS Chicago)
Galaxy, a 3-month-old kitten receiving treatment for ringworm (PAWS Chicago)
CHICAGO - PAWS Chicago needs the public's help in providing foster homes for dogs and cats, the animal shelter said this week.

The shelter said its medical center is at capacity and running out of space, which prevents the organization from saving more animals from high-kill shelters.

"When we are out of room, we are unable to save as many animals as we want. Animals, particularly those with medical issues, need loving care to heal and thrive, away from the stresses of shelter life," said PAWS Chicago Director of Animal Operations Stacy Price.

Pets in need of foster families include:
Galaxy, a 3-month-old kitten receiving treatment for ringworm
Fergus, a 4-month-old kitten recovering from upper respiratory infection
Drexel, a 2-year-old Shepherd mix waiting for a dental procedure
Benton, a 6-year-old Beagle mix recovering from a double ACL surgery

Jones, a senior 12-year-old heartworm positive Cocker Spaniel

PAWS rescues more than 5,000 homeless cats and dogs each year, but they need to visit the medical center to receive care, spay/neuter operations and vaccinations before they can be adopted. While many are ready for adoption right away, the majority - approximately 3,000 a year - require more extensive treatment.

Foster families are necessary to provide a temporary, loving home for cats, dogs, puppies and kittens while they heal and thrive, PAWS said. Each time a foster family takes an animal home, it opens up space at the medical center to save another life.

All experience levels are welcome. If you're interested in learning more about what is involved in fostering, click here.

If you are interested in fostering, email foster@pawschicago.org or fill out the PAWS Chicago foster application form here.
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