Escaped inmate caught

April 9, 2008 9:28:33 AM PDT
A Cook County Jail prisoner who escaped while being transported to Stroger Hospital has been found.Officials said the prisoner, who had a leg injury, used his crutches to overpower a guard outside of the hospital near the emergency room around 10 a.m. Officials said he then jumped into a waiting vehicle, which sped off.

The prisoner, 27-year-old Kirk Davis, was in jail on an aggravated battery charge. He was not shackled at the time of his escape because of his alleged injuries.

Police found him at a home at 71st and Langley. Officials say Davis had shaved his head in an attempt to change his appearance.

He faces additional charges. At least four other people in the home with him were also arrested.

Police had also searched for the getaway van and the three people who aided in Davis' escape. The van was believed to have fled by the highway.

Authorities said they didn't know if Davis was armed. But they said he was presumed dangerous.

Officials said the injured guard is expected to be OK. He was treated at Stroger Hospital.

"I assumed the inmate may have fell on the crutches, but I noticed the corrections officer was knocked down and getting up slowly. And they jumped into the van that was waiting for them," said one witness who did not want to be identified.

"He overpowered the officer and was able to then physically run out the door with crutch and shackle," said Tony Godinez, Cook Co. Jail executive director.

The escapee was taken for treatment in handcuffs and a shackle for unknown condition. He was in jail since March 13 in maximum security.

Davis is 6 feet tall, weighing 160 pounds with brown eyes, black hair, wearing corn rows, a cook county correction uniform and bandages on one leg.

"Some of the shackles were removed, one left on him was on his arm that was shackled to one of the crutches that he had. He was here for various treatments. He's high escape risk now," said Godinez.

Storger Hospital officials say they treat inmates daily.

"One officer with one detainee, in many cases we do two-on-one because of the nature of the high-profile case or the nature of the offense," said Godinez.

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