ABC 7 Chicago's Harry Porterfield honored with Lifetime Achievement Award

May 5, 2008 11:56:59 AM PDT
ABC 7 Chicago's veteran reporter, Harry Porterfield, will be honored with the National Association of Black Journalists' Lifetime Achievement Award presented at the association's Salute to Excellence Gala, Saturday, July 26, in Chicago. Past recipients include the late Ed Bradley of CBS' "60 Minutes," Black Enterprise publisher Earl Graves and CNN anchor emeritus Bernard Shaw. Porterfield joined ABC 7 News in September of 1985 after 21 years at WBBM-TV in Chicago. At ABC 7 Chicago, Porterfield is a feature news reporter appearing on various newscasts. He is known for the continuing series of human-interest "Someone You Should Know" reports which air Tuesdays and Thursdays on the 5 p.m. newscast. Porterfield created the series in 1977 at WBBM-TV and over the years has profiled some 2,000 subjects from individuals to organizations. He also hosts "People, Places & Things," a series of locally produced half-hour specials featuring prominent African Americans who have achieved honor and respect in the community

The winner of 11 Emmy Awards, Porterfield began his broadcasting career in 1955 as a jazz disc jockey with WKNX-AM in Saginaw, Michigan, later becoming its cameraman and stagehand at WKNX-TV. Porterfield joined the CBS station in 1964 as a news writer and later rose to news anchor. He is an active jazz violinist and narrator at concert performances.

According to Jennifer Graves, Vice President and News Director, ABC 7, "Harry Porterfield's signature "Someone You Should Know" profiles have illuminated the many important and diverse stories in our city that needed to be told. After years of award winning journalism, Harry has become "Someone Everyone Knows" in Chicago. We are thrilled that NABJ has recognized Harry and his extraordinary career with their Lifetime Achievement Award."

"Harry is a Chicago broadcast icon and a master storyteller," said NABJ Vice President of Broadcast Kathy Times. "Generations of Chicagoans have a better vision of their community thanks to decades of his special reports. What better place to honor him than among the people who love him best."


Load Comments