Chicago Machine encourages Chicagoans to responsibly recycle electronics, ink cartridges

July 16, 2008 8:56:30 AM PDT
Chicago Machine, in partnership with the 30 area Cartridge World stores, is hosting a recycling event for computers, monitors, cell phones, printers, phones, ink and laser cartridges and more. The goal is to encourage consumers to reuse, refill and recycle electronics and cartridges. Chicago Surplus Computer will be on hand to haul away and responsibly recycle all e-waste products dropped off. Those participating in this unique e-waste program will receive FREE admission to that day's Chicago Machine Lacrosse game and a coupon for a free inkjet cartridge refill.

Sunday, July 20, 2008
12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Chicago Machine vs. Los Angeles Riptide - Major League Lacrosse game

3:30 pm to 5:30 pm
Toyota Park
7000 S. Harlem Avenue
Bridgeview, IL 60455

  • Electronic waste accounts for 70 percent of the overall toxic waste that is currently in landfills
  • In 2005 alone almost two million tons of e-waste ended up in landfills
  • In addition to valuable metals like aluminum, electronics often contain hazardous materials like lead and mercury
  • It does not take much lead or mercury to contaminate an area's soil or water supply
  • It takes at least 450 years for one ink cartridge to break down in a landfill, allowing harmful materials to seep into the earth
  • Some components made of industrial grade plastics will take over one thousand years to decompose
  • Seventy percent of cartridges used worldwide are thrown out
  • It's estimated that there are over 500 million used cell phones ready for disposal now
  • Cell phone batteries were originally composed of nickel and cadmium (Ni-Cd batteries)
  • Cadmium is linked as a human carcinogen that causes lung and liver damage
  • Mercury is contained in computer circuit boards, which also include lead and cadmium
  • With the fact that the FCC is going to require all televisions to run a digital signal by February 19, 2009, we could see a lot of lead from older TV's (cathode ray tubes - CRT) heading for landfills
For more information visit www.classiccomputerrecovery.com.

Load Comments