McCain, Obama pushing for battleground votes

November 2, 2008 9:16:05 PM PST
In the final hours of campaigning, Barack Obama is pushing hard for Ohio, a state that traditionally goes Republican.John McCain is telling voters in Pennsylvania that he's got momentum in that traditionally Democratic state.

When the campaign is all wrapped up, Obama and McCain together will have spent about $8 per vote.

With two days to go, most national polls show Obama ahead.

A big rally for the Illinois senator will be held in Chicago's Grant Park Tuesday night. Tickets will be required to get in.

Barack Obama's rallies usually begin with singer Bruce Springsteen on tape, but Sunday night, the legendary blue-collar rocker known as "The Boss" introduced the Obama family in person to an estimated 80,0000 supporters in Cleveland, where Obama borrowed a line from Springsteen to wind up a get-out-the vote rally.

" We're going to change this country, and we will change the world. A rising is coming," the Illinois senator said.

Obama's raised an all-time record $659 million for his campaign, nearly three times as much as McCain's $233 million. So, the television ads just keep on coming, like a new one that borrows a line from Vice President Dick Chaney's endorsement of McCain.

Obama is leading John McCain by 11 points in the latest ABC News-Washington Post poll 54-43. According to the ABC political unit, Obama is ahead of McCain in the 16 states won by John Kerry in 2004 and in five of the states won by President Bush, for a total of 291 electoral votes, which is 21 more than the 270 he needs to win.

That means that McCain has to win all five of the remaining toss-up states and two of the blue states where Obama is leading, like Pennsylvania and New Hampshire. That's also the reason Obama's chief strategist, David Axelrod, told ABC's George Stephanopolous Sunday that he is only worried about one thing.

"The main thing I worry about is complacency. I don't want people to hear me or anyone and think this campaign is over," he said.

McCain was not conceding anything while he campaigned earlier Sunday in Pennsylvania and Sunday night in New Hampshire, where he rallied twice to win GOP primaries.

" I can sense the enthusiasm and the momentum in the last 48 hours. We're going to win this race, my friends," John McCain said.

McCain is trailing Obama by nine points in the latest New Hampshire poll. He is down by seven points in Pennsylvania. McCain also is sufficiently worried about reliably-red Indiana to schedule a stop in Indianapolis Monday afternoon, which is prompting Obama, who staged a big rally in Highland on Friday, to pencil in another indiana stop in indianapolis on election day. Because the hoosier state is a dead heat. And turnout will be the deciding factor for those 11 electoral votes.

As for Tuesday's rally for Obama in Chicago, the Chicago Transit Authority is making some changes for election night to accommodate people attending events downtown. The CTA will provide additional service and extended hours on some bus and train routes.

The following bus routes will leave downtown until 2 a.m.: Routes 3, 4, 6, 12, 14, 126, 146 and 147.

All northbound buses that pass through downtown will board on LaSalle. All southbound buses will board on Clark.

As for trains, all lines will provide service until at least 2 a.m. Red and Blue lines will operate around the clock as usual.


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