Governor meets with high-profile attorney

December 14, 2008 9:02:56 AM PST
Governor Blagojevich left his Northwest Side home Saturday morning with file folders in hand, heading to the downtown office of high-profile attorney Ed Genson, whom Blagojevich has reportedly retained for legal counsel.

Genson confirmed with ABC7 that he met with Blagojevich Saturday. However, he says the governor has not yet hired him.

The governor said 'good morning' to reporters Saturday, but he said nothing about when, or if, he will resign his office.

Pressure continues to mount for the Democrat to step aside, especially since Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan, who was once considered a possible replacement for President-elect Barack Obama's vacant Senate seat, as well as interested in a run for Illinois governor in 2010., asked the state's Supreme Court to declare the embattled politician unfit for office.

It's the first time in the state's history that such a request has been made.

"I don't have anything to contribute to that. I hope that she's successful," the Rev. Jesse Jackson told ABC7 Chicago Saturday.

Jackson's son, Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. remains tangled in the growing web of the ongoing scandal and is cooperating with the U.S. attorney after he identified himself as 'Senate Candidate Number 5' in the government's criminal complaint accusing Blagojevich of a litany of corruption, including trying to sell Illinois's senate seat, pressuring the owners of the Chicago cubs, and threatening to withdraw millions of dollars from a children's hospital.

While attending the opening of a new police station, Chicago Mayor Richard Daley would not say whether or not the governor should resign.

"Look at his family, and also understand what the people of Illinois want. He should do the right thing for his family and for the people of Illinois," Daley said.

The Chicago Tribune reported Saturday that Obama White House Chief of Staff and Congressman Rahm Emanuel spoke with the Blagojevich administration about who would fill the Senate seat left vacant by the president-elect, even giving the governor's chief of staff a list of Democrats acceptable to Obama to fill the senate seat.

The report does not suggest any wrongdoing or deal-making on the part of Emanuel.

If the governor does resign, ti would short circuiti any action taken by the legislature, which would, most likely, try to start a special election. A resignation would also short-circuit any action by the courts to declare Blagojevich unfit to serve.


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