Caribbean Parfait from Common Threads

January 25, 2010 8:41:33 AM PST
Common Threads is a non-profit organization that teaches low-income children to cook wholesome and affordable meals. It offers hands-on cooking classes we can help prevent childhood obesity and reverse the trend of generations of non-cookers, while celebrating cultural differences and the things people all over the world have in common. Students from Common Threads were on ABC 7 News Saturday morning to create a recipe for Caribbean Parfait. Caribbean Parfait from Common Threads

Equipment:

  • 4 special glasses, such as a martini glass
  • 2 Potato mashers
  • Liquid measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • 2 medium bowls
  • 2 spatulas
  • 6 small bowls for toppings

Ingredients:

  • 2 C blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 2 C strawberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 1 qt Greek style yogurt (unsweetened)
  • ¼ C agave nectar
  • 2 C granola with whole grains (such as flax seeds and oats)
  • ½ C macadamia nuts, chopped
  • ½ C dried pineapple
  • ½ C dried mango
  • ½ C dried, unsweetened coconut
  • 3 kiwis, peeled and diced
  • ½ C blueberries
  • ½ C strawberries, diced

Put 2 C of the blueberries into a bowl. Use the potato masher to crush the blueberries until it looks more like a paste. Add in 2 T of the agave nectar and 2 C of the yogurt and mix with the spatula to combine. In the other medium size bowl, place the strawberries. Use the potato masher to smash the strawberries until it looks more like a paste. Take out your special glasses. Put ¼ C of blueberry yogurt in the bottom of the glass. Add a layer of granola, then toppings of your choice! Repeat layering 3 times, or until glasses are full! Serve cold! If you would like, make up to 12 hours before and refrigerate!

(News Release) In effort to help prevent childhood obesity and reverse the trend of generations of non-cookers, while celebrating our cultural differences and the things people all over the world have in common, this December, Common Threads will launch its first cookbook, Eat the World: Good-for-You Food for Families. Founded by Art Smith in 2003, Common Threads' mission is to educate children on the importance of nutrition and physical well-being, and to foster an appreciation of cultural diversity through cooking and the arts.

Childhood obesity is a very real and growing problem in low-income, urban communities across the country and at a time when the CDC estimates that 1 in 3 Americans will develop diabetes and calls childhood obesity "a major public health problem," all families and children can benefit from learning to prepare healthy food. Eat the World: Good-for-You Food for Families cookbook will feature simplified versions of the healthy, ethnically diverse recipes our students cook together in class. Recipes have been selected and ingredient lists simplified, for easy cooking with just a child and a parent, or a family of four. All recipes are nutritious, economical, and full of fresh produce and vibrant flavors, so they're easy and fun for families to make at home. The user-friendly cookbook will include color photos, allowing parents, siblings and kids of all ages and health levels to prepare healthy recipes at home. The cookbook reinforces important nutrition information alongside every economical and nutritious recipe.

Yield: 6 Servings of 1 cup each. (1 serving of fruit + 1 serving of protein + 1 serving grain)

The book is available for $25 online at commonthreads.org

About Common Threads

Common Threads is a non-profit organization founded in 2003 by Art Smith, cookbook author and Oprah Winfrey's former personal chef. The mission is to educate children on the importance of nutrition and physical well-being, and to foster an appreciation of cultural diversity through cooking and the arts. The organization teaches children in some of Chicago's most underserved neighborhoods at more than 18 locations throughout the city, two locations in Los Angeles, two locations in Miami and one location in Washington, D.C. Common Threads provides free after-school programming to children ages eight to 12 years old that are on the free or reduced lunch program.


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