Puppies from Tenn. mill arrive in Chicago

April 27, 2010 7:37:51 AM PDT
More than 80 puppies that were rescued from a puppy mill in Tennessee have been brought to Chicago to receive care from the Humane Society until suitable homes can be found.

According to the Humane Society of the United States, the owner of the dogs was overwhelmed, and she was seeking assistance. The Humane Society was called for their emergency placement services. It's the first stop on the dogs' journey to find new homes.

Monday night, a truck arrived carrying precious cargo -- dozens of dogs that were rescued from a puppy mill in Sparta, Tennessee. Eighty four dogs, mostly poodles and Yorkies, were carefully unloaded and placed into the caring arms of the volunteers. Some of the dogs are as young as a few days old.

Investigators say the dogs have been living in squalor and poor conditions and they lacked medical attention. Some were malnourished and shivering when they arrived.

"Some of the animals had genetic deformities. Some of the animals were suffering from dental disease as well as some other illnesses," said Justin Scally.

The dogs are among 225 rescued Friday from Gayla's Poodle Palace after authorities were alerted. On the Humane Society's website, there is video of the dogs immediately after they were discovered. At least 160 were found inside the home. They have all been examined and given microchips and vaccinations, but they have to go through a recovery process.

"We will let them settle for a day or two. We will then do our vetinary assessment on them, give them a complete physical exam...then as the animals are acclimated to the situation they will be put up for adoption," said Dr. Robyn Barbiers, president, Anti-Cruelty Society.

Dr Barbiers says that could take days even weeks because while the physical injuries may subside, the psychological scars take much longer to heal.

"The psychological effects of the cruelty and horrendous conditions that they have lived in with the lack of care and interaction from humans last a long time," said Scally.

Dr. Barbiers says please don't call the Anti-Cruelty Society right away because they are still accessing the dogs. But there will be a picture of every dog on their website.

For more information, please visit www.anticruelty.org


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