Tea Party rallies for Brady; Alvarez stands by Quinn

Governor Pat Quinn (D) and State Senator Bill Brady (R) campaign on Saturday, October 16, 2010.

October 28, 2010 4:35:01 AM PDT
With just days until Election Day, the major candidates in the gubernatorial race are turning to their supporters.

Democrat Pat Quinn appeared with Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez Wednesday while Republican Bill Brady attended a Tea Party rally in southwest suburban Homer Glen.

Hundreds of people attended the rally that featured three Republican governors, Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, Bob McDonnell of Virginia and Haley Barbour of Mississippi.

"It's a great day for all three of us to be in Illinois because this is where we are going to take our country back," said Gov. Barbour.

That was the rally call from the Republican governors who are pushing conservative voters to show up on Election Day.

"Only voters win elections. Everybody has got to tell their friends, their family members, their neighbors. This is the most important election of our life time," said Gov. Jindal.

Along with rallying voters, Gov. Jindal talked about political corruption, a theme Bill Brady jumped on.

"The people of Illinois are tired. They are tired of the antics and they're ready to retire the Rod Blagojevich and Pat Quinn era," Brady told the crowd.

Other Republican candidates got a boost and were pleased to see the out-of-state governors in Illinois.

"Just the fact that they are coming to such a blue state like Illinois is a big message that's being sent. What's the message? That we're going to make a big change this November," said Thomas Holewinski, Tea partier.

The Republican governors are off to New Hampshire and Pennsylvania Thursday. The "Remember November" tour runs through Saturday.

Earlier Wednesday, Governor Quinn picked up an endorsement from Cook County's State's Attorney Anita Alvarez. He spoke about fighting crime, improving education, and a Democrat who's coming to town to get out the vote.

"I think you were here in early 2007, that Rod Blagojevich announced to the world that I'm not part of his administration. He didn't talk to me. I favored a recall while he was governor," said Gov. Quinn.

The Independent in the race - Scott Lee Cohen - also picked up an endorsement Wednesday from a group of African-American pastors.

"I have been excluded debate after debate. I have been discriminated against," said Cohen.


Load Comments