NATO journalists focused on summit, not sightseeing

May 23, 2012 7:03:25 PM PDT
One of the reasons Mayor Rahm Emanuel wanted Chicago to host the NATO summit was to put Chicago on a global stage through journalists. Did it work?

The mayor said those journalists could experience the city and heighten Chicago's image, which could lead to a potential boost in the local economy.

During the two-day NATO summit, reports from Chicago disseminated around the world. But did any show off the city? Journalists ABC7 spoke with on Tuesday, the day after NATO ended, had been focused on the summit.

Some journalists who came to Chicago for the NATO summit remained for events like a series of forums with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Turkish journalists will report on President Abdullah Gul's remarks on Turkey's economy. Journalists on assignment say they caught only a few glimpses of Chicago.

"Spending two days here, not visiting the city or downtown because of the work we have to do, Fatih Sahin, Ebru TV, said.

Hundreds of journalists covered the news of the NATO summit and made by their heads of state. But many said they had a limited view of Chicago -- just between the hotel and Millennium Park.

Some reporters from the Czech Republic stuck around to hear their president speak in Chicago on Tuesday.

"I never really had the times to enjoy the city but I hope to make the trip a special one. The next trip," Pohanka, Czech Public Radio, said.

"Today went to Millennium Park and the waterfront and I also saw some architecture by Mies Van Der Rohe on the way here because I came by car. I must say I love Chicago," Fucik, Czech News Agency, said.

Petr Janousek is a journalist with a Czech newspaper. He says the summit was too busy to report on anything beside NATO news, but hopes to return for a future assignment.

"No people marching in the streets. No police all over. I think Chicago must be amazing without NATO stuff," Janousek said. "Many journalists were in and out quickly."


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