Violent weekend leaves a city searching for answers

June 9, 2012 10:00:00 PM PDT
A group rallied for peace Sunday after another violent weekend in Chicago. The group rallied after a shooting killed two men on the South Side.

And on Sunday, seven teenagers were charged with felony mob action after attacking and robbing a tourist on State Street. That tourist ended up with a broken jaw.

But that violence pales in comparison to the deadly violence some neighborhoods saw this weekend.

The numbers are staggering: six people killed, 34 wounded in shootings since Friday.

Those who marched Sunday were mothers, fathers, children and ministers and all are affected by the violence that seems to have increased dramatically over the past several months.

And they are marching for answers.

Alease Davies son, Rashaun Stephany , was an aspiring musician who just released a video on YouTube when he was shot in his front yard Friday.

"He was on his way to the studio to make his music," she said. "That is all he ever did. They snatched him away. It hurts so bad."

Family and friends have set up a small memorial near where he and his cousin, 26-year-old Mario Jackson were killed. Jackson's family joined the anti-violence rally and prayer down the street.

"It's a pain that there that will never go away," said the victim's brother, Darrin Dishman. "The love and support is good but there's still going to be that hurting pain."

Children carried signs asking for the violence to stop. Adults call on political leaders to bring economic development to the community so teenagers have hope for the future.

And the violence is in many other communities around the city, including downtown where Saturday night several people were mugged, including one who was beaten and robbed by a group of teens in the Gold Coast. Several others were reportedly attacked as they left Grant Park for the Blues Festival.

Guardian Angels volunteers were out helping offer protection Sunday night. And many festival goers are being extra careful.

"My guard is always up," said Red Line rider Kim Norah. "My guard is always up when I'm in public."


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