Supreme Court upholds health care law; Small-business owners react

June 29, 2012 4:02:48 AM PDT
The challenges of having a small business have much to do about that bottom line. And if health care is in that budget, it's significant.

The Supreme Court narrowly upheld President Barack Obama's historic health care overhaul Thursday with the unlikely help of conservative Chief Justice John Roberts.

Some local small business owners say the health care law act helps them balance the bottom line with helping themselves and their employees while others say it will be a financial burden.

Bloodshot Records is the label behind dozens of indie rock bands. The music business can have its ups and downs, but recently the label's co-owner, Nan Warshaw, says a $6,000 credit has helped. The credit was for paying for employees' healthcare. Warshaw was glad to see the Supreme Court uphold the Affordable Care Act for the company's employees and the hundreds of musicians they represent -- some without insurance.

"I think it's great," she said. "It's sorely needed for the small businesses like ours. It's a great benefit."

Mark Weyermuller, owner of a property management business, was disappointed with the Supreme Court's decision. He says the cost of healthcare and other benefits keep him from adding employees. He expects the act will add even more burden to small businesses.

"I don't think healthcare will change all that much," said Weyermuller. "We have the greatest healthcare in the world, and we will continue to. It's just, it's going to end up costing everybody more money and it will just be the same."

Pattie Sheehan, a mastectomy fitter, has been watching the news of the Supreme Court's decision. Her clients are breast cancer survivors who she says will benefit from the act. And she expects it to help her. She's currently pays $600 a month for her own insurance.

"For me, having an opportunity to get a more reasonable price on my insurance is going to be a big part of this," she said.

Sheehan hopes the savings for her insurance and a growing business model will allow her to hire employees. Right now she's a one woman show, but she says the act will help her be on track to hire employees next year.


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