Drew Peterson Murder Trial: Jury seated, opening statements begin next week

July 24, 2012 3:31:41 PM PDT
A jury is now seated in the murder trial of Drew Peterson. Twelve jurors and four alternates have been chosen to decide if Peterson is guilty in the murder of his third wife, Kathleen Savio.

The Drew Peterson murder trial is set to begin with opening statements next week.

Jury selection only took two days, although it did start a bit late Tuesday morning because Peterson could not fit into his pants. Apparently, he gained weight in jail, so he had to be outfitted with another pair.

Ever since Peterson was charged with killing his Savio, it has been the court of public opinion that has determined the former Bolingbrook cop's guilt or innocence.

Now it is up to seven men and five women to decide Peterson's future. It is a jury that both sides like. Peterson's attorneys call it "a great one."

"It's from all different walks of life, they come from all different places, they're male, they're female, they're young, they're old. It's perfect. It's exactly what you want. It's an exact mirror of the people that live here," said Peterson's attorney Joe Lopez.

"We've very happy with how jury selection went," said Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow. "We're looking forward to opening statements next Tuesday."

The jurors include a broadcasting student at Columbia College, a secretary, a part-time poet and an older man who is taking up flying as a hobby.

For a second day in a row, Peterson introduced himself to a new pool of jurors. Dressed in a navy blue blazer with gray pants, Peterson said, "Good day ladies and gentleman, my name is Drew Peterson, I'm the defendant in this case. I'd like to thank you for your time and wish you all a good day."

While jurors were questioned individually, Peterson took notes and helped his attorneys.

"He has always played a role," said Lopez. "He knows his community, he knows these people, and it's his trial, and he's able to give us a lot of input that we listen to."

Moving on to the trial, Peterson's attorneys say it is up to their client decide if he wants to take the stand in his own defense.

"When the state closes its case, he may not worry about taking the stand because he may not have to," said Peterson's attorney Joel Brodsky.

Before leaving the courthouse Tuesday afternoon, Glasgow said he is anxious for trial to finally begin.

Glasgow plans to give the opening statement for the prosecution. Peterson's lead attorney, Brodsky, will give it for the defense.

The trial is expected to take between three and four weeks.


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