Presidential debate 3: Bob Schieffer to moderate Obama v. Romney on foreign policy

October 22, 2012 3:32:17 PM PDT
In the third presidential debate, President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney will square off on foreign policy Monday night. Bob Schieffer moderates.

Voters head to the polls in just about two weeks, and Monday is Obama and Romney's third and final chance to win over the public during a live debate, held in Boca Raton, Florida, at Lynn University.

Obama's supporters in South Florida think the president has an advantage when it comes to foreign policy.

"Ending the war in Iraq, drawing down the war in Afghanistan, pursuing the war on terror, breaking the back of Al Qaeda, getting Bin Laden," Stephanie Cutter, Obama Campaign, said.

"That's going to be in stark contrast to Mitt Romney, who every time he's talked about foreign policy has been blustering. He's had several missteps. He's offended our closest allies," Melanie Roussell, Obama Campaign, said.

Republicans say that Romney will argue that Bin Laden's killing is the Obama administration's only foreign affairs victory.

"Bin Laden's death is important but it is not the do-all, say-all for our National Security concerns around the world," Rep. Mario Diaz-Balar, (R) Florida, said.

"When he talks about it constantly he creates the impression that Al Qaeda was defeated and in many ways Al Qaeda is as strong now as it was back on September 11, 2001," Rep. Peter King, (R ) New York, said.

Most pre-election polls suggest the presidential race here is too close to call, with Florida voters again sharply divided.

"North Florida resembles the South in terms of its political culture, but south Florida resembles the North in its political culture so we always say that the farther north you get the farther south you are," Prof. Robert Watson, Lynn University, said.

Boca Raton's Lynn University -- founded in 1962 -- paid the commission on presidential debates between four and five million dollars to host the event. Both the Obama and Romney camps are concerned the debate might not reach as many viewers, given the fact the bears versus lions and baseball playoff games also are scheduled tonight:

"This is one of those things that's going to be watched live and then with the internet it will be watched again, and again, and again through many different mediums. I'm a football and baseball fan but I'm going to choose to watch this tonight," Kevin Ross, Lynn University president, said.


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