Jeep's Twitter account hacked

Screenshot of Jeep's Twitter account after hacking.
February 19, 2013 11:25:56 AM PST
It appears Jeep is the latest corporate customer to fall victim to a Twitter hack attack.

Sometime around 1:00 p.m. somebody hacked the Jeep account, changing the logo to a Cadillac and posting obscene messages.

Cadillac (@Cadillac) was quick to tweet on its own account, "Just to clarify, Cadillac is not connected to the hack of the @Jeep Twitter account."

The attack comes a day after somebody hacked Burger King's Twitter account changing its profile picture to a McDonald's logo and also posting obscene tweets.

Late Monday, Burger King tweeted: "Interesting day here at BURGER KING, but we're back! Welcome to our new followers. Hope you all stick around!"

Burger King, which usually tweets several times a week, typically does so to promote sales on chicken sandwiches, or to ask questions such as how many bites it takes to eat a chicken nugget.

But just after noon EST on Monday, someone tweeted via Burger King's account, "We just got sold to McDonalds!" They also changed the icon to rival McDonald Corp.'s golden arches and the account's background picture to McDonald's new Fish McBites.

About 55 tweets and retweets followed over the next hour and a quarter, including some that contained racial epithets, references to drug use and obscenities. The account tweeted: "if I catch you at a wendys, we're fightin!"

Monday's appropriation of Burger King's Twitter account was a relatively mild example of cybersecurity problems, which are causing increasing concern in Washington and for industry. Media outlets including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post have all said this year that their computer systems were breached, while several NBC websites were briefly hacked in November.

Twitter acknowledged on Feb. 1 that cyber attackers may have stolen user names and passwords of 250,000 users. It said at the time that it notified users of the breach.

Some information from the Associated Press.

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