Zimmerman jury lone minority member from Chicago

July 15, 2013 4:29:41 PM PDT
The Chicago woman who was on the George Zimmerman jury had just moved to Florida a few months ago and found herself on the highest-profile criminal case in years.

George Zimmerman Verdict Protests PHOTOS

You never saw her face on TV or heard her name, but one of the six women who acquitted George Zimmerman of murder was from Chicago. And from the jury selection process and court records, we know some of the details about the recent Florida transplant from Chicago who held one-sixth of Mr. Zimmerman's fate.

When the verdict was announced Saturday night, George Zimmerman showed little immediate emotion, but one of the jurors did, according to onlookers: the woman known only as B29 teared up. B29 was the identification assigned to the only minority member of the panel.

She is Hispanic, possibly Dominican; married for 10 years and has eight children. B29 was still living in Chicago when Trayvon Martin was killed in February of 2012 and moved to Seminole County, Florida, just four months ago. She currently works as a nurse in an Alzheimer's facility. These details came out during the jury questioning and selection process last month and are reflected in court transcripts.

"I'm from Chicago and just got here," she said when questioned at the time. "I really don't know anything about the case."

"I remember people selling t-shirts, and some kid died," B29 said. "In Chicago, we have a lot of crime."

There is still a court order guarding the jurors' identities and prohibiting the disclosure of their names or revealing specifically where they live. B29 might not see it even if she was publicly identified. She doesn't follow the news she told the judge.

"I don't like watching news, period," she said.

The Chicago transferee is a fan of Facebook and reality TV and told the court she prefers the show "Bad Girls Club," a cable show about seven misbehaving women.

During the trial itself, reporters noted that B29 appeared bored with the testimony at times and disinterested. During jury selection, she said that she would have a difficult time deciding guilty or innocence regardless of how the trial went. But in the end, she was with the others unanimously voting that the prosecution didn't prove its case against George Zimmerman.


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