Brunch honors MLK legacy

Brunch honors MLK legacy
August 26, 2013 6:00:03 AM PDT
The Willard Hotel is rich in history, playing host to President Lincoln the night before his inauguration. The "Battle Hymn of the Republic" was written there, as well. And it is same place where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. constructed the text of the iconic "I Have a Dream" speech.

Fifty years ago Dr. King and his advisors worked in the lobby of the Willard Hotel instead of his room so that the FBI would not record the discussions taking place as the final touches were being made on his message for the masses.

Five decades later, the daughter of Dr. King reflected on the legacy and the new mission: Jobs, justice and freedom.

"No matter how many relationships we've made across races, ethnic lines, you have to work on the systems and the structures that have become racist, they we're still going to have a lot of problems," said Bernice King.

The Willard Hotel has since undergone renovations but now there is a suite dedicated to the civil rights leader on the third floor. And in the lobby a life size replica of the of Dr. King on loan from Madame Tussauds Museum.

At this historic landmark today a celebration to honor Dr. Kings included his favorite hymn.

Ambassador Andrew Young has devoted his life to being a drum major for justice. He was one of Dr. King's advisors.

"It was just a convergence of a mass of wonderful people," Young said.

Young was with Dr. King in the days leading up to the march. The former ambassador said the world was inspired on that day 50 years ago but Dr. King would be disappointed about the lack of progress since the speech.

"The whole nation is beginning to be aroused again. Which form it will take, I don't know. We've got to put an end to poverty, we've got to narrow the gap between the rich and the poor," he said.

The King Family posed for photos. There is hope that this future generation will carry on the dream.

"Those of us born in '63 and afterwards that have responsibility to move our world toward what my father called the beloved community," said.

Rev. King is challenging the next generation to pick up the baton and advance the civil rights movement to fulfill her father's dream she says is yet to be realized.


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