Illinois governor race focuses on money; Bruce Rauner to face Pat Quinn after winning Republican primary for Illinois governor

Money is always an issue in political campaigns and it is usually about raising cash to fund the campaigns, but in the race for governor in Illinois Pat Quinn wants to focus on his opponent's personal bank account.
March 20, 2014 4:16:27 PM PDT
Money is always an issue in political campaigns and it is usually about raising cash to fund the campaigns, but in the race for governor in Illinois Pat Quinn wants to focus on his opponent's personal bank account.

Another day of class warfare in Illinois politics as the state's top Democrat proposes a tax on millionaires, while incumbent Pat Quinn suggests his republican opponent is too rich to be governor.

"Billionaire Bruce Rauner wants you to know, he's not just part of the one per cent, he's part of the 0.01 percent."

The Quinn campaign posted the video focused on Bruce Rauner's nine homes and the $53 million Rauner reported earnings in 2012.

"What do you do with that much money? 'Money Fight'! Do you want someone like Mr. Burns representing you in Springfield?"

The governor, continuing his campaign to raise the minimum wage, saw no problem with a video criticizing Rauner's wealth.

"That's his own definition of himself, that he's in the 0.01 percent," Quinn said.

Earlier, the Republican introduced independents and Democrats who support his campaign.

"I'm taking a leave of absence from my party because Illinois is in desperate shape," said Rauner supporter Newton Minow.

Rauner's Democrat wife Diana noted her husband has used some of his wealth to build healthcare and community centers.

"Bruce has given of his time and his talent as well as his treasure," Diana Rauner said.

Later in Springfield, House Speaker Michael Madigan filed a bill for a vote this fall on a constitutional amendment to impose a tax on millionaires.

"There would be a 3 percent surcharge put on the money, the income over a million dollars," he said.

Rauner, who wants vote on term limit on the ballot this fall, has not commented on the Madigan millionaire tax.

Governor Quinn, who praised the Gap clothing store chain for raising its minimum wage, said a new tax on the wealthiest residents was something to at least consider.

"I think it's worth looking at, for sure, but again I'd have to look at the details," Quinn said.

Finally, don't discount possible gamesmanship in the Madigan millionaire tax proposal. If Rauner gets his term limits amendment on the ballot next fall and thinks he'll use the long-term speaker as a poster boy then Madigan could use Rauner as a poster boy for the millionaire tax.


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