Veteran and double amputee hopes to inspire by running multiple marathons

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One military veteran is on a mission few could even dream of trying, especially with two legs. (WLS)

One military veteran is on a mission few could even dream of trying, especially with two legs.

Rob Jones lost both of his legs in combat. Now he's running marathons across the country to inspire others.

It's the latest and perhaps the most challenging journey for Rob Jones in his mission to serve his country by helping fellow military veterans.

"I'm trying to show them an example of a guy that came back wounded. I had a traumatic experience and was still able to contribute," said double amputee Rob Jones.

The retired Marine Corps sergeant has vowed to run the equivalent of 31 marathons in 31 cities in 31 days.

His quest began last Thursday in London, England and continued in the United States and Canada.

Jones will run 26.2 miles in each city and then travel to the next in a rented RV. Chicago was city number ten.

"Vets come home and they're wounded, sometimes they think they're no longer capable of being a part of society," said Jones.

Life changed for Jones in seven years ago, during his second tour of duty in Afghanistan as he did his job clearing IEDs as a combat engineer.

"On July 22, 2010, I was in the process of doing that and the IED found me first and that resulted in a double above the knee amputation," said Jones.

Since then, not only has the 30-something won a bronze medal in the 2012 Paralympics, he's also the first and only double-above-the-knee amputee to ride a normal bicycle over 5,100 miles across America.

While his sponsored journey remains dedicated to raising thousands of dollars for several military charities, Rob Jones hopes his month of marathons will inspire hope.

"I want people to see a person that had a tragedy or had a hardship and figured out a way to use that hardship to their advantage instead of seeing it as something that's blocking their path," said Jones.

Jones will head to St. Louis and then Kansas City, eventually ending his mission in Washington D.C. on November 11, Veterans Day.

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societymarathonsamputeemilitaryveteranveterans dayu.s. & world
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