US Marshals take 1,500 of country's most violent criminals off the streets in special operation

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Thursday, July 7, 2022
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Nationwide authorities said they brought in more than 1,500 dangerous criminals, focusing on those they consider most dangerous.

CHICAGO (WLS) -- More than 1,500 of the country's most violent criminals are now off the streets as part of the Justice Department's "Operation North Star."

Arrests were made in 10 cities, including Chicago.

As U.S. Marshals showed up to arrest 19-year-old Terrion Johnson on murder charges, they say he opened fire at them, injuring a senior Marshall and K-9. Both are recovering, but Johnson is now facing additional federal charges.

Federal authorities said he is one of more than 150 fugitives they brought in from northern Illinois last month in the special operation.

"We do this all the time but this was an initiative in advance of the summer months where we see an increase in violent crime," said LaDon Reynolds, U.S. Marshal Northern District.

Nationwide authorities said they brought in more than 1,500 dangerous criminals, focusing on those they consider most dangerous. Teaming with Chicago Police, county and federal officers in the Chicago area, Operation North Star brought in 156 alleged violent offenders, including those wanted for homicide, robbery and sexual assault.

"Working in partnership to hold accountable those responsible for the greatest violence afflicting our neighborhoods," said John Lausch, Northern District U.S. Attorney.

Authorities said among the other suspects they arrested included the accused gunman who stole a car and shot two people in February, killing 23-year-old Miracle Cotton. Authorities said they also captured another suspect who allegedly kidnapped a woman and handcuffed her to a wall for several days, as well as sexually assaulted her.

"I think the goal was to identify violent offenders who had the most propensity for violence and in that capacity we met our goal," Reynolds said.

Authorities said they focused on suspects who used a gun while committing a crime because they say history is a good indicator of future violent crime.