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Police: Scott's ID, money clip found in river

Recovered gun belonged to Scott
November 18, 2009 3:02:21 PM PST
The gun found with the body of Board of Education President Michael Scott belonged to him, Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis said Wednesday. Scott's body was found on Monday morning on an embankment near the Chicago River. He had been shot in the head and a gun was found under his body.

On Wednesday, Supt. Weis said the gun recovered from the scene was purchased by Scott in 1981 and his money clip and cash were found in the water, which suggests he did not meet with foul play.

"CPD divers recovered his money clip, an ID card and a credit card. That long with the discovery of his cell phone suggest this was not a robbery," said Chicago Police Dept Supt. Jody Weis.

Investigators still need to look through ballistics evidence to compare the bullet, as well as look at video surveillance from the scene.

"I don't want to make any judgments until we have all those facts," said Supt. Weis.

While police maintain they need more time to investigate before ruling in the case, the Cook County Medical Examiner ruled the death a suicide on Monday. On Tuesday, Medical Examiner Dr. Nancy Jones questioned the police investigation and the moving of Scott's body. Her comments were not supported by Chicago Mayor Richard Daley.

"Enough with the medical examiner. Let's stop this. You want 15 minutes of fame, they gave it to you," said Mayor Daley on Wednesday.

Supt. Weis also said his team moved the body because of the location in which it was found.

"It is not unusual to move a crime scene," said Supt. Weis. "We do this occasionally when the location the body might be is posing a threat to investigators."

"A decision was made to preserve evidence and the body itself," said one police spokesperson.

Emotions ran high for the mayor, who was a close friend of Scott's for over 30 years. The mayor did not appreciate a reporter's question when he was asked about his own political career and Scott's death.

"Someone that you love dies change your public career? For the sake of people dying? That's an insult -- what a silly question to ever ask anybody," said Mayor Daley.

Group calls for independent investigation

Earlier Wednesday, a group of ministers and activists said they believe Scott, who has a long history of service in the city of Chicago, was murdered. They held a vigil and asked for an independent investigation.

They believe the medical examiner rushed to judgment and believe that evidence was compromised when police moved Scott's body before they contacted the medical examiner's office.

Activists say Scott was too committed to his family, his children and wife to commit suicide.

"Two weeks ago, Michael was talking about his children, who were mourning the death of their mother around Memorial Day," said Harold Davis. "And what they said, what Michael said, was that he was really helping them through this grieving process and that they were having a hard time getting past it. And this man is the primary caretaker for his sister after suffering a stroke and cancer. So, Michael, being the unselfish person that he was, would never put this pain on his children."

"It is hard to accept the fact this brother taking his own life and because of that, that is why we called this press conference, because we want to make it real clear that with all the brothers on the street he helped," said Kublai Toure, friend. "We believe it was a murder, and we are saying to all the brothers that are out there on the street, we need your eyes and ears because we are going to get to the bottom of this."

Asked who would have murdered Scott, they said they don't know because he didn't have enemies.

Family releases statement

Scott, 60, is survived by two adult children and his wife, Diana Palomar Scott, who is the vice president of community affairs at ABC7. The family released a statement Monday: "The family of Michael W. Scott deeply appreciates the outpouring of support during this time of unimaginable grief. Our personal loss is also shared by many throughout Chicago, the home he loved so much. We will miss him greatly. Arrangements for a public memorial service will be announced shortly."


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