Jesse Jackson arrest: Chicago activist arrested in Washington, DC while protesting for voting rights

Jackson also arrested last month in Phoenix, Arizona after refusing to leave Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's office
WASHINGTON -- Dozens of activists, including the Rev. Jesse Jackson, were arrested in Washington, D.C. Monday, while protesting for voting rights.

Jackson, who said he participated in marches for the original 1965 Voting Rights Act, was protesting state challenges to voting rights and calling on Congress to pass nationwide protections, CNN reported.

The daughters of Lyndon Johnson, the president who got the Voting Rights Act passed in 1965, were also at the rally.

"In the 1960s, Democrats and Republicans stood up together for social justice. It was the right thing then, and it's the right thing now," Luci Baines Johnson Turpin said.

The march from Union Station to the Supreme Court was organized by the Rev. William Barber of the Poor People's Campaign.

They began walking with the marchers but then caught rides to catch up as they walked past the Capitol and then the Supreme Court.

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Participants from many areas attended. Three brothers from New Jersey were learning.

"The Civil Rights movement and stuff like that, I'm really trying to learn, and get active in my community and society," one protester said. "I came all the way here from New Jersey."

Women in their 70s were remembering protests at an early age.

"Yeah we fought this battle before and we're not going back to Jim Crow," one woman said.

The arrests started because protesters blocked Constitution Avenue in front of two Senate office buildings.

Capitol police said 204 people were charged with misdemeanors and released.

Jackson and Barber were among 39 people arrested last month after refusing to leave the Phoenix office of Democratic U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, who has faced unrelenting pressure from liberal activists over her opposition to ending the filibuster to pass voting rights legislation.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.