Through Sept. 5: "Green with Desire" at CAF

June 29, 2008 2:11:23 PM PDT
Committed to promoting environment- friendly behavior, The Chicago Architectural Foundation has opened a new exhibition examining how homes determine the quality of our lives and the health of the planet. The first in a three- part series, "Green with Desire: Can we live sustainably in our Homes", runs from June 24 through September 5 at 224 S. Michigan Avenue. Admission is free.

Upon arrival, visitors will instantly be in awe of the immense green structure that is a replica of what an environmentally friendly home could look like.

"We are offering a unique experience that encourages people to think about how we might live 'green' in homes not designed for sustainable living, which is what we inhabit," said Gregory Dreicer, Vice President of Exhibitions and Programs

The replica helps address values the foundation feels people seek in their homes, such as comfort, privacy, shelter, ownership, permanence, privacy, affordability and status.

"Each of the eight values looked at in the exhibition was paired with a case study from Chicago's landscapes. For instance, for comfort, we looked at an early glass wall modernist skyscraper on Lake Shore Drive. To be comfortable in a building with glass walls took the extreme uses of heating and cooling systems as well other energy and resources. This clearly is not ideal for green living," said Kate Keleman, Exhibit Curator.

So what does it mean to be green?

"I define it as balancing the quality of life and the health of the planet, but it's a relatively new concept and people are exploring what it means in their daily life," said Gregory Dreicer.

Chicagoans and tourists alike have the opportunity to explore the definition of "green" for the remainder of the summer.

The other two exhibits in the series include "A Place We Call Home" and "Dorothy's House". "A Place We Call Home" illustrates how racial attitudes have influenced segregation in our nation's cities. "Dorothy's House", based off Frank Baum's novel "The Wizard of Oz", examines how the roles of women and children have changed during urbanization.

The Chicago Architectural Foundation (CAF) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing public interest in and learning about cities, sustainability, and innovation. CAF pursues its mission through tours, exhibitions, special events, and lectures. For further information, visit www.architecture.org.


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