Ind., Wis., voters react to debate

October 15, 2008 8:52:12 PM PDT
The signs don't look good for the McCain campaign in Wisconsin.The signs don't look good for the Ariz. Sen. John McCain's campaign in Wisconsin. The Republican National Committee has stopped running McCain ads in that state.

Indiana is still considered a toss-up.

It was the last TV debate, and most voters have picked Ill. Sen. Barack Obama or McCain. And those who are undecided in the contested state are seriously considering other presidential candidates.

"It'd still be Ralph Nader, but Obama's breaching in there," said Kevin Parli, Ralph Nader supporter.

"I've sat down with my way better half, and she and I have talked that we need something new. I still have questions. There were no questions with Gravel," said Jonathan Rix, Mike Gravel supporter.

Those are just a few Indiana voters who gathered Wednesday night for a non-partisan viewing party at Indiana University Northwest. Those voters who are undecided, such as Wayne Cousins, say they are still gathering information about both candidates. And, even Wednesday night, Cousins isn't sold on Obama or McCain, especially when it comes to alternative energy policies.

"The American people have directions that they want to go in with regards to alternative energy, fuel and other issues. But the politicians are not listening to us," Cousins said.

Some voters in Lake County are already casting their ballots at early voting satellite offices. Historically, Indiana has voted for Republican presidential candidates. In fact, voters there have not backed a Democrat since Lyndon Johnson in 1964. Indiana voters understand the pressure. The nation is watching.

" I don't know who I want to vote for, I just don't," said Laura Barnoski, undecided.

To the north, in a Kenosha, Wis., restaurant, voters were also keeping an eye on Wednesday night's debate. Polls here show a double-digit lead for Obama and on Wednesday, the Republican Party announced that it's pulling out and will not spend anymore money on ads in the state.

"That's why your average person votes Democratic, because the Republicans bail out every year," said John Daniels, voter.


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