Rose Hill Cemetery honors military vets

November 11, 2012 3:37:22 PM PST
Veterans Day is a day to remember the contributions and sacrifices of those who have fought for our country.

Sunday, veterans from all of America's military battles were honored at a North Side cemetery.

The unique remembrance is in its 20th year and looks to honor veterans by honoring their sacrifice and commitment.

A volley of cannon fire was just one way those here chose to remember all who have fought and died for our country.

On this Veterans Day, America's past and present service men and women were honored.

The tribute to decades of human sacrifice took place at Rose Hill Cemetery, the largest burial ground of Union Civil War soliders in the Midwest and the final resting place for thousands of American veterans.

"It is for our kids to know where we came from," said Rosehill Cemetery General Manager Diane Comer. "People came over here and they had to go through these different wars to get where we are today, to have our freedom."

A parade of military re-enactors, dressed in uniforms representing the nation's conflicts dating back to the Revolutionary War, illustrated the solemn nature of sacrifice.

Both song and historic readings honored America's heroes in a reflection service inside the historic May Chapel.

"I hope that we would rejoice and be very happy and glad that these people were willing at some point in their life to write a blank check and say do with me what you will," said Abe Lincoln re-enactor Max Daniels.

For more than two decades, Jerry Feinstein has organized the remembrance service with the help of his family.

The Korean War veteran, along with Rose Hill, has replaced the damaged grave headstones of servicemen and women buried at the historic cemetery.

"I've replaced 49 stones. they're guys you'd know if you followed the civil war," Feinstein said.

American flags now mark the graves of all veterans as a reminder to never forget.

Both the curious and the committed attended the special service.

Those involved say they hope Sunday morning's parade and ceremony will help the public respect and honor the significance of veterans, not just today, but every day.


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